SUBWAY RESTAURANT MEALS AND THEIR NUTRITIONAL VALUE

SUBWAY RESTAURANT MEALS AND THEIR NUTRITIONAL VALUE-min

Subway restaurants provide fresh healthy foods for old and kids alike. However, they also serve some unhealthy foods high in sugars, fats, calories. You can customize your meals that meat your daily caloric intake.

There are over 40,000 subway food stations in the world, promising you fresh foods. Though they are the most famous fast-food restaurants, their eat fresh tagline does not tell you the whole nutritional story. Subway restaurants are known for their sandwiches and customized customer meals created for you at your order. While many prefer to go to a subway restaurant for its accommodative pricing and fresh meals, not all items on the menu are healthy. Some of the popular meals taken at a subway restaurant are high in salt, fat, sugar, and calories. However, since the customer orders what they would like to eat, having a clear understanding of the nutritional content and the ingredient used in creating a sandwich, salad, or wrap, you can order a healthy fresh meal in these restaurants. Additionally, you can take advantage of Subway’s nutritional guide to determine in advance the nutrition information of your meals before placing an order.

Healthier Meals at a Subway Restaurant

You can be sure to get healthy meals at a Subway restaurant from their healthy items in the Fresh Fit menu. The items here are known to be low in fat and calories while high in protein. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), most of these foods are heart-friendly. Subway restaurants are proud to be the first fast-food outlet to receive a Heart-Check Certification from AHA in a world where fast foods are demonized for exacerbating heart problems. Let’s dive into some popular Subway foods’ nutritional components, from the healthiest to the unhealthiest meals.

Sandwiches

Sandwiches are the most ordered Subway food as it easy to make, and many people in a hurry can take a sandwich to work. Sandwiches that qualify for a Heart-Check Certification should have 9-grain wheat bread, tomatoes, lettuce, green peppers, cucumbers, and onions. The amount of sodium (salt) should also meet the laid standards for what is healthy. Let’s take a look at some popular sandwiches and their content.

Sandwichcaloriescarbssugarfiberproteinsodiumfat
Six-inch black forest ham sandwich29046g8g5g18g800mg4.5g
6-inch roast beef sandwich32045g7g5g25g670mg5g
6-inch turkey sandwich28046g7g5g18g760mg3.5g
6-inch veggie delite sandwich23044g7g5g8g280mg2.5g
6-inch Subway club sandwich31046g8g5g23g850mg4.5g
6-inch rotisserie-style sandwich24745g7g5g29g550mg6g
6-inch sweet onion chicken teriyaki sandwich37058g16g5g35g770mg4g
6-inch oven-roasted chicken sandwich32046g8g5g23g610mg5g

Salads

Many salads from Subway restaurants have been awarded Heart-Check Certification. These salads contain cucumbers, spinach, green peppers, tomatoes, olive, onions, and meat protein where possible. Their nutrition information is as follows.

SaladcaloriesCarbssugarfiberproteinSodiumfat
Veggie delite salad509g6g4g3g75mg1g
Oven-roasted chicken breast salad1309g6g4g19g280mg2.5g
Black forest ham salad11011g8g4g12g600mg3g
Subway club salad14011g7g4g18g640g3.5g
Roasted beef salad14010g7g4g19g460mg3.5g

The AHA certification is only awarded to salads dressed with sweet onions. The dressing has no fat, adds 40 calories, 9g carbs, 8g sugar, and 85mg of sodium to each serving.

The Unhealthy Meals found at Subway restaurants.

Though most meals promise freshness and health, not all meals served at a Subway are nutritious. We bring you a list of meals with the least nutritional value.

Mealcaloriescarbssugarfiberproteinsodiumfat
6-inch chicken Caesar melt sandwich54046g8g5g37g940mg24g
6-inch chicken and bacon ranch melt sandwich61047g8g5g38g1,290mg30g
6-inch classic tuna sandwich48044g7g5g20g580mg25g
Egg, cheese, and bacon breakfast sandwich45044g6g4g25g1,310mg18g
Bacon and chicken ranch salad54013g9g4g32g1,290mg40g
6-inch flatbread with mega melt omelet60044g3g2g34g1,890mg31g
Spicy Italian salad30011g8g4g14g1,280mg23g
Pepperoni flatizza50044g4g2g26g1340mg26g

Subway Meals nutritious for Kids

Subway restaurants offer meals that you can enjoy with your kids too on a day out. These foods also meet the AHA Heart Check Certification. The kids’ meals are often accompanied by a mini sandwich, low-fat milk, and apple slices. Interestingly, even a grown-up can order kids’ meals and be served. The nutrition for these meals is as below.

MealsCaloriesCarbsSugarFiberProteinSodiumFat
Roast beef20029g5g4g14g390mg3g
Veggie Delite15029g4g3g6g190mg1.5g
Turkey breast18030g5g3g10g430mg2g
Black forest ham18030g5g3g10g450mg2.5g

Best and Worst Subway Toppings

Meals at a Subway restaurant often come with topping, and they can add or spoil the meals’ nutritional value. You need the right information to determine which toppings add to the value of your meals and which ones to avoid. Healthy toppings include spinach, cucumbers, onions, lettuce, bell peppers, tomatoes, banana peppers, avocado, jalapenos, mustard, vinegar, and sweet onion dressings.

On the other hand, less healthy toppings you want to eliminate off your subway diet include ranch dressing, bacon, chipotle southwest dressing, pepperoni, meatballs, pepperoni, cheese, sausage, and mayonnaise,

The Bottom Line

Subway restaurants are easy to go to food joints that promise you fresh, healthy fast foods that most fast-food restaurants. Most of their meals are healthy with low sugar and a healthy source of protein and fiber. Nevertheless, some of the foods at the subway restaurants are loaded with high levels of sodium and fat that may not be friendly to your heart. The beauty of Subway meals is that you can customize them depending on your preference. Therefore, you can choose a combination of meals that are healthy with suitable toppings. Additionally, there are also foods suitable for kids that your family can enjoy. Next time you are at a Subway restaurant, choose healthy meals for healthy living.

Nataly Komova

Nutritionist. Bluffton University, MS In today's world, people's eating and exercise patterns have changed, and it is often lifestyle that is the cause of many diet-related illnesses. I believe that each of us is unique – what works for one does not help another. What is more, it can even be harmful. I am interested in food psychology, which studies a person's relationship with their body and food, explains our choices and desires for specific products, the difficulty of maintaining optimal body weight, as well as the influence of various internal and external factors on appetite. I'm also an avid vintage car collector, and currently, I'm working on my 1993 W124 Mercedes. You may have stumbled upon articles I have been featured in, for example, in Cosmopolitan, Elle, Grazia, Women's Health, The Guardian, and others.

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