strongest to weakest

List of NSAIDs from strongest to weakest

Introduction:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are a commonly prescribed medication class used to manage pain and inflammation. They work by blocking the production of prostaglandins, a type of hormone that promotes inflammation and sensitizes pain receptors. NSAIDs are widely used for various types of pain management, including headaches, arthritis, menstrual cramps, and postoperative pain.

However, not all NSAIDs are created equal, and they differ in terms of their potency and duration of action. Some are stronger than others, while others are more effective for specific types of pain. In this comprehensive guide, we will discuss the list of NSAIDs from strongest to weakest.

List of NSAIDs:

Diclofenac: Diclofenac is a potent NSAID that is commonly used for the management of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other types of pain. It is available in various formulations, including tablets, capsules, and topical gels. Diclofenac is considered one of the strongest NSAIDs available, and it is often used when other NSAIDs are not effective. However, diclofenac can cause stomach upset and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, so it should be used with caution.

Ketorolac: Ketorolac is a powerful NSAID that is used primarily for the management of moderate to severe pain, such as pain after surgery or injury. It is available in injection, tablet, and nasal spray formulations. Ketorolac is not recommended for long-term use because of its potential to cause kidney damage and gastrointestinal bleeding.

Piroxicam: Piroxicam is a strong NSAID that is often used for the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It is available in tablet and capsule formulations. Piroxicam has a long half-life, which means it can provide pain relief for up to 24 hours. However, it can also cause stomach upset and increase the risk of bleeding and ulceration.

Naproxen: Naproxen is a commonly used NSAID that is available over-the-counter and by prescription. It is used for the management of various types of pain, including headaches, menstrual cramps, and arthritis. Naproxen has a longer half-life than other NSAIDs, which means it can provide pain relief for up to 12 hours. However, it can also cause stomach upset and increase the risk of bleeding and ulceration.

Indomethacin: Indomethacin is a potent NSAID that is often used for the management of gout and other types of arthritis. It is available in capsule and suppository formulations. Indomethacin is known for its strong anti-inflammatory effects, but it can also cause stomach upset, dizziness, and headaches.

Ibuprofen: Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID that is available over-the-counter and by prescription. It is used for the management of various types of pain, including headaches, menstrual cramps, and arthritis. Ibuprofen has a shorter half-life than naproxen, which means it needs to be taken more frequently. However, it is generally considered safer than other NSAIDs and has a lower risk of stomach upset and bleeding.

Aspirin: Aspirin is a commonly used NSAID that is available over-the-counter and by prescription. It is used for the management of various types of pain, including headaches, menstrual cramps, and arthritis. Aspirin is also used as a blood thinner to prevent heart attacks and strokes. However, aspirin has a higher risk of bleeding and stomach upset than other NSAIDs, and it should not be used in children due to the risk of Reye’s syndrome.

Monika Wasserman
Latest posts by Monika Wasserman (see all)

Monika Wassermann is a doctor and a freelance writer based in the UK who lives with her cat Buddy. She writes across several verticals, including life, health, sex and love, relationships and fitness. Her three great loves are Victorian novels, Lebanese cuisine, and vintage markets. When she’s not writing, you can find her trying to meditate more, weightlifting, or wandering around in town.

Latest from Medical